Cinema Jam: “Uncanny Terrain: The Documentary About the Devastation of Fukushima and Japanese Farming”

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eating boy

Marija Makeska interviews filmmakers Junko Kajino and Ed M. Koziarski in Cinema Jam:

Junko: “Just like most of the Japanese people, I was always afraid of radiation from our history of atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The aftermath of the atomic bombs that we learned gave me nightmares for long time. The Fukushima Daiichi plant’s melt down gave me strong fear and lost hope in my own country till I found some farmer’s blogs. Some active framers were trying to decontaminate their contaminated land in Fukushima organically. I could not believe that they can do that and even they could keep farming without getting sick. But I wanted to believe that they can do this. Only way to find out is to go there and record how they do.”

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Ten Thousand Things: Still Praying for Tohoku

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Asami campaign

Organic farmer and darkhorse mayoral candidate Asami Akihiro canvasses the mountain villages that ring Kitakata City.

Ten Thousand Things from Kyoto writes: “Uncanny Terrain follows mayoral candidacy of organic farmer in Fukushima.

Via filmmakers Junko Kajino and Ed M. Koziarski, at work on Uncanny Terrain, a documentary exploring the lives of organic farmers in Fukushima in the aftermath of 3/11…”

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We return to Fukushima to cover farmer’s campaign for mayor

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Akihiro Asami left his life as a city salaryman to raise his family on a self-sustaining organic farm in the mountains of Kitakata, on the western outskirts of Fukushima prefecture.

When the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant melted down in 2011, Akihiro’s wife Harumi evacuated with their two young daughters.  Akihiro stayed behind to continue farming.  In the face of public fears of Fukushima food, some of Akihiro’s neighbors were unable to keep their farms going and moved away.  Akihiro found his crops showed no detectible contamination from the fallout.  He worked to hold his community together.

In 2012, Harumi and the girls moved back to Kitakata, accepting the risk of exposure over the pain and disruption of separation and displacement.

This month, Akihiro announced that would run for mayor of Kitakata on a platform of local economies and natural agriculture as an alternative to the unsustainable systems that spawned the nuclear disaster.

In January we return to Fukushima to capture Akihiro’s dark horse campaign, a hopeful protest by one Fukushima farmer for a better way to live.

Please help us to continue our journey, complete the film, and share the stories of Akihiro and his fellow Fukushima farmers with the world.  We gratefully accept tax-deductible donations.

Uncanny Terrain 2013 Photo Set 2

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“Still ‘Praying for Japan’ — ‘Uncanny Terrain’ explores impact of 3/11 on Fukushima family farmers, animals, soil, & nuclear evacuees”

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Ten Thousand Things From Kyoto:

“This film is a must for all who are continuing to ‘pray for Japan’ — for all who support the safety of Japanese people and animals, the recovery of Tohoku, and the survival of traditional Japanese rural culture.”

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Fukushima 2013

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Fukushima Year Three: Renewal

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As we mark the second anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, we present the new trailer for our in-progress documentary Uncanny Terrain, following the organic farmers of Fukushima fighting for the right to cultivate their contaminated land and preserve their traditional communities.

We plan to return to Fukushima this spring to capture where the farmers are two years later, as they continue their efforts to rebuild their lives and restore their farms.

Please help us cover the cost of making this trip and completing the film, by making a tax-deductible donation.

Seeds of Hope

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Since the disaster, 24-year-old Mizuho Sugeno has worked side-by-side with her parents on their organic farm in the tiny town of Towa in the foothills of the Abukuma Mountains.

Mizuho has founded the company Seeds of Hope, dedicated to Towa’s renewal.  Seeds of Hope distributes the Sugenos’ organic produce, demonstrates successful methods to prevent crops from absorbing radiation, and hosts guests to experience the idyllic farming lifestyle.

“After 3/11, Fukushima land was contaminated,” Mizuho says.  “Farms were abandoned. People were left behind.  Agriculture changed. By planting seeds, the power of the soil comes back.”

seedsofhope